Do Not Buy a Car From Curry Chevrolet in Scarsdale

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Against my better judgment, I went to Curry Chevrolet on Sunday with my wife. We’re in the market for a new car and despite my discomfort with buying an American car, we did have relatively good luck with our eight year old Chevrolet Malibu. We figured we would go in, look around, and see what the new one was like.

A representative took us inside, showed us the car, and we fell in love with it. It was a beautiful color, had a leather interior, and had every option we wanted all in one car. There was nothing we could ask for that wasn’t in the car. He grabbed the keys from a similar car in inventory and took us up to take a test drive. “How willing are you to sign the papers today?” he asked me. “Very willing if the numbers work out.” My wife nodded at me. We hadn’t intended on buying right away, but why wait if the numbers looked good?

We took the test drive and I was in love. The car handled smoothly, had great acceleration, and just felt like a dream. Now that I work in Nanuet, I put about 60-70 miles a day on my car so I felt comfortable spending that much time in this car. We returned to the dealership, sat down to do the paperwork, and that beautiful blue Malibu on the showroom floor was going to be ours.

As we were sitting there, our sales rep asked around if that car had been sold. Everyone chimed in that it was not, and there was no tag on the vehicle (like there was on the other sold ones) saying it was sold. While we were signing the paperwork, our rep got a phone call and when he hung up, he informed us that it was a person looking to put a deposit down on the car so we had to hurry up and sign the papers (yeah, looking back on it, I don’t believe it either). We didn’t care; we were signing them anyway. We were going to trade in our car and add whatever we needed to to make the deal.

Paperwork done, car signed for, I called GEICO and added it to my insurance and added our sales rep as an authorized contact so he could finalize the insurance. The car was now ours. We had to go back on Monday to sign the paperwork, talk to the finance guy to finalize the deal, and get our tradein appraised. Even though there was a blizzard in NYC yesterday, we made it up on time for our appointment. Our sales rep wasn’t there, so we worked with another one. They started the appraisal and we started chatting. As we were talking to him, the Sales Manager came over to us and put a piece of paper down on the table we were sitting at. “I have good news and bad news,” she told us. “The good news is that we’re going to give you the $1500 for your tradein even though we don’t think the car is worth that much. We think the car is worth $1000, but we’re going to eat the difference.”

I was fine with that. “The problem is that the car you wanted isn’t available. The rep sold it to you but he didn’t know someone else had already bought it the night before.”

My wife and I were stunned. After signing the paperwork under the pressure of “sign it now sign it now sign it now,” there was no car. How the hell did that happen? “I do have another one for you to look at, though.” She showed us a similar car in “gold mist.” Now, I’m not a pimp and I’m not 50. A gold car? Really? “It’s the same color as your car.” Oh really? My car is galaxy silver, and obviously so.

I balked at the idea. My wife and I went back to her and asked her if they had any other colors available. The Sales Manager proceeded to come up with model after model of cars that weren’t similarly equipped to the one we thought we bought, or were 2-3000 more than what we were paying for the one we wanted.

One car didn’t have a sunroof. Another didn’t have the six cylinder engine. Another had a horrid two-tone leather interior. She sensed our skepticism and told us we should sign the paperwork and let her get the car detailed for us so we could look at it tonight. I was okay with giving it a shot, but I could see my wife’s displeasure with the whole process starting to shine through. We sat down to fill out the paperwork and I realized that I was about to spend $2000 more for a car I didn’t really want from people who had just screwed me over. I told the rep to stop writing and we were just going to go somewhere else.

Yes it was an upgraded model, and according to them we were getting a great deal (I’ll admit the deal wasn’t really that bad), but it still wasn’t what we wanted. No matter how many times my wife tried to explain that we’d be “settling,” we were informed no less than twenty times how “nice” it was and how “classy” the car was and so on. I was getting EXTREMELY annoyed. I told her I’d be back today to get my refund of my deposit because, I was informed, the cashier only works until 5:30. Isn’t that great for a dealership that’s open until 8?

We finally, after ten minutes of nagging, got her to just let us go. I was told that she was having the car we didn’t want detailed anyway and I could take a look at it and I’d fall in love with it and that would be the end of it. I resigned myself to the fact that I’d have to put up with one more trip to these people so I could get my $2000 back and move on with my life. I sucked it up, and left. On the car ride home, Beth and I lost our minds. We were so aggravated at the placating gladhanding treatment we got, and the fact that they sold the car out from under us. Not only that, but in trying to make it right, they weren’t even giving us the same car and were charging us, at minimum, $2000 more for it! Then, on the way home, it hit me. I had added that new car to our insurance policy. As far as GEICO was concerned, that car was insured by me! Someone drove the car off the lot with insurance coverage I was paying for!

I lost my mind. I came home and immediately called GEICO to have the car removed. This was at 8:50pm. I checked my e-mails and saw that we had gotten a voicemail at 8:40. It was from GEICO congratulating us on the purchase of our new car and wanting to confirm the details with us. I lost my mind. I ran into the bedroom to tell Beth. “Those sons of bitches called GEICO and had the car added to our policy!” Beth’s eyes widenened. “When?” “Ten minutes ago!” Essentially, half an hour after the deal was already dead, the dealership called GEICO to add a car we said we didn’t want to our policy.

I couldn’t believe it. Now I was furious. Then we got a voicemail from the Sales Manager. She had located a blue Malibu, exactly the same as the one we thought we bought and wanted us to come in and see it when she had it transferred over from another dealer. “I don’t want it, and I’m furious that you called my insurance company to add a car after you knew the deal was dead.” After some firm and angry scolding, I informed her that I would not be returning today to get my deposit and told her at 9:30, when her cashier gets in, I want my deposit back on my card. No questions asked. She was annoyed with me! As if I had wronged her by calling her out for effing with my insurance! Here she was doing me a favor, and here I was being ungrateful.

No joke. She actually hung up on me because I was “stressing her out.” Today, that refund better be on my card or I’m raising holy hell with those bastards.

This is what I had to put up with. Despite knowing better, and despite the relatively crappy experience I had the last time I bought a Chevrolet in 2001 (and again in 2004), I went to a Chevrolet dealer again. If Chevrolet wants to know why no one wants to buy American cars any more, maybe they should look at their dealers. The high pressure crap, the sneakiness, and the outright lies (you’re not marking the car up at all? Really? Then why are you so desperate to sell it to me?) convinced me to never deal with Chevrolet or any other car company (with one exception; my dad’s dealer who he got his Pontiac G6 from was awesome and I would give him a shot if the opportunity arose) under the GM umbrella again.

Curry Chevrolet is a disgrace, plain and simple. Chevrolet should be embarrassed that their name is on that awning.

  • gojeffrey

    I work in the automotive industry and am keenly aware of the bad reputation car dealers have. It frustrates me to hear these stories (and I hear a lot of them) because I genuinely care about my company, and I know that much of our success or failure depends on our dealer network.

    Unfortunately this type of bad customer service can be found at dealers of all makes, not just the domestics. Yes, some car makers have stellar overall dealer performance and consistently come out at the top of the JD Powers results (Lexus anyone?), but even those dealer networks have some bad eggs. I don’t work for Chevy, but I’m still sorry you had to endure this kind of treatment.

    In these economic times, many car makers are forced to run leaner and more efficiently than ever in order to survive. Part of the strategy for many of these companies (including GM) is to reduce the size of their dealer network. GM plans to reduce theirs by 1/3 over the next 5 years (that’s over 2,100 dealers). My company is on a similar track (on a smaller scale). This presents an opportunity for the car maker to weed out under-performing and problem dealers and focus on cultivating franchises that are good for the company and for the consumer. I know this doesn’t change what happened to you, but maybe there is hope for the future?

    Just my two cents.

    Be patient, don’t compromise, and you will find the right car.

  • gojeffrey

    I work in the automotive industry and am keenly aware of the bad reputation car dealers have. It frustrates me to hear these stories (and I hear a lot of them) because I genuinely care about my company, and I know that much of our success or failure depends on our dealer network.

    Unfortunately this type of bad customer service can be found at dealers of all makes, not just the domestics. Yes, some car makers have stellar overall dealer performance and consistently come out at the top of the JD Powers results (Lexus anyone?), but even those dealer networks have some bad eggs. I don’t work for Chevy, but I’m still sorry you had to endure this kind of treatment.

    In these economic times, many car makers are forced to run leaner and more efficiently than ever in order to survive. Part of the strategy for many of these companies (including GM) is to reduce the size of their dealer network. GM plans to reduce theirs by 1/3 over the next 5 years (that’s over 2,100 dealers). My company is on a similar track (on a smaller scale). This presents an opportunity for the car maker to weed out under-performing and problem dealers and focus on cultivating franchises that are good for the company and for the consumer. I know this doesn’t change what happened to you, but maybe there is hope for the future?

    Just my two cents.

    Be patient, don’t compromise, and you will find the right car.

  • Jordan

    You made the Consumerist blog…congrats!

    I just got a Hyundai Sonata that I’m totally in love with. You should seriously take a look at it.

  • Jordan

    You made the Consumerist blog…congrats!

    I just got a Hyundai Sonata that I’m totally in love with. You should seriously take a look at it.

  • http://www.insignificantthoughts.com/ Vinny

    In fairness, the experiences I hear from friends who get imports just doesn’t jive with the utter garbage I have gone through TWICE with Chevrolet (2 different dealers). I think I’m just done overall. I like the cars, but the gatekeepers (ie: the dealers) make me not want to do business with them. Frankly, if this is the kind of Stock GM has representing them, I’m not so sure I want to do business with GM in any capacity ever again.

  • http://www.insignificantthoughts.com Vinny

    In fairness, the experiences I hear from friends who get imports just doesn’t jive with the utter garbage I have gone through TWICE with Chevrolet (2 different dealers). I think I’m just done overall. I like the cars, but the gatekeepers (ie: the dealers) make me not want to do business with them. Frankly, if this is the kind of Stock GM has representing them, I’m not so sure I want to do business with GM in any capacity ever again.

  • Jane

    If they don’t refund immediately, contact your credit card company and do a chargeback.

  • Jane

    If they don’t refund immediately, contact your credit card company and do a chargeback.

  • t-r0y

    Did the original paper work that you signed for the car you didn’t get have the VIN number on it? If so, could this be fraud?

    • http://www.insignificantthoughts.com/ Vinny

      It did, actually. Their argument was that the guy filled it out not knowing the car was sold.

  • t-r0y

    Did the original paper work that you signed for the car you didn’t get have the VIN number on it? If so, could this be fraud?

    • http://www.insignificantthoughts.com Vinny

      It did, actually. Their argument was that the guy filled it out not knowing the car was sold.

  • http://www.jasonlitka.com/ Jason Litka

    Wow… That stinks, but to be honest, is exactly what I’ve come to expect from Chevy dealers. A few years back my then-girlfriend-now-wife decided to buy a off-lease 2002 Chevy Malibu. The dealer we got it from gave her an OK deal, nothing stellar, but that was back when things were good and dealers could get away with gouging people over crappy cars (Note: The newer Malibu is WAY, WAY nicer than the 2002).

    Anyway, I digress… In the dealership there was a big sign that detailed everything that came with every vehicle they sold. It wasn’t much, a full tank of gas, outstanding maintenance taken care of, vehicle detailed inside & out, etc. A copy of this was stapled to the sales order she signed, as was a list of issues with the vehicle that were to be fixed before it was picked up (the center console was loose, cigarette lighter missing, though she doesn’t smoke, small scratch above driver’s door). We left the dealership and were told that the vehicle could be picked up the next day, any time after 10 AM.

    We came back the next day at 10 AM and the sheet with all the To-Do’s on it was mysteriously missing and the sales manager flat out called us liars, claiming that the sales rep would have never agreed to give us a full tank of gas, have the vehicle cleaned, replace the cigarette lighter, or fix a scratch & loose screw. He refused to do anything, saying that a deal is a deal, that we had to take the car as-is, and that if we didn’t it would be a breech of contract and that they’d sue us because they had another buyer that they turned away (not really possible since we left AFTER closing and showed up the next morning with their showroom only having been open for an hour).

    Now, I don’t take kindly to being screwed, especially not so blatantly. I decided to sit in a chair in the dealership showroom and tell every single person who walked through the door exactly who it was they were considering doing business with. After I got 3 or 4 people to leave, the sales manager tried to kick me out. I refused, telling him that they’d have to call the cops. At that point the owner (whom I lived about a block from) came downstairs and asked what was going on. I explained the situation and he was absolutely appalled at what had happened. The problems were taken care of immediately and I left as happy as I could be, considering that I wasted about an hour of my Saturday.

    Long story short, not everyone involved in a dealership is a jerk and is out to screw you, those most sales people are, and even though the owner made it right, I’m never going to buy a Chevy again (the last one I owned was a 93 Blazer) and there’s no way I’ll let a family member buy one either.

  • http://www.jasonlitka.com Jason Litka

    Wow… That stinks, but to be honest, is exactly what I’ve come to expect from Chevy dealers. A few years back my then-girlfriend-now-wife decided to buy a off-lease 2002 Chevy Malibu. The dealer we got it from gave her an OK deal, nothing stellar, but that was back when things were good and dealers could get away with gouging people over crappy cars (Note: The newer Malibu is WAY, WAY nicer than the 2002).

    Anyway, I digress… In the dealership there was a big sign that detailed everything that came with every vehicle they sold. It wasn’t much, a full tank of gas, outstanding maintenance taken care of, vehicle detailed inside & out, etc. A copy of this was stapled to the sales order she signed, as was a list of issues with the vehicle that were to be fixed before it was picked up (the center console was loose, cigarette lighter missing, though she doesn’t smoke, small scratch above driver’s door). We left the dealership and were told that the vehicle could be picked up the next day, any time after 10 AM.

    We came back the next day at 10 AM and the sheet with all the To-Do’s on it was mysteriously missing and the sales manager flat out called us liars, claiming that the sales rep would have never agreed to give us a full tank of gas, have the vehicle cleaned, replace the cigarette lighter, or fix a scratch & loose screw. He refused to do anything, saying that a deal is a deal, that we had to take the car as-is, and that if we didn’t it would be a breech of contract and that they’d sue us because they had another buyer that they turned away (not really possible since we left AFTER closing and showed up the next morning with their showroom only having been open for an hour).

    Now, I don’t take kindly to being screwed, especially not so blatantly. I decided to sit in a chair in the dealership showroom and tell every single person who walked through the door exactly who it was they were considering doing business with. After I got 3 or 4 people to leave, the sales manager tried to kick me out. I refused, telling him that they’d have to call the cops. At that point the owner (whom I lived about a block from) came downstairs and asked what was going on. I explained the situation and he was absolutely appalled at what had happened. The problems were taken care of immediately and I left as happy as I could be, considering that I wasted about an hour of my Saturday.

    Long story short, not everyone involved in a dealership is a jerk and is out to screw you, those most sales people are, and even though the owner made it right, I’m never going to buy a Chevy again (the last one I owned was a 93 Blazer) and there’s no way I’ll let a family member buy one either.

  • http://www.thereheis.com/ SLEZE

    Of the cars that I owned, I have only dealt with foreign car dealerships (my Ford Explorer had been a hand-me-down). While they all tried to use salesmanship tricks, none of them (VW, Nissan, Toyota, Subaru, Audi and Honda – I didn’t buy from them all, I only shopped them) tried to pull anything REMOTELY close to this crap.

    Support the economy by only buying quality cars. Cull the herd – most foreign cars are made in the US anyway.

  • http://www.thereheis.com SLEZE

    Of the cars that I owned, I have only dealt with foreign car dealerships (my Ford Explorer had been a hand-me-down). While they all tried to use salesmanship tricks, none of them (VW, Nissan, Toyota, Subaru, Audi and Honda – I didn’t buy from them all, I only shopped them) tried to pull anything REMOTELY close to this crap.

    Support the economy by only buying quality cars. Cull the herd – most foreign cars are made in the US anyway.

  • Darrell

    I’m gonna share this story with as many people as I can. This is straight-up BS.

  • Darrell

    I’m gonna share this story with as many people as I can. This is straight-up BS.

  • http://www.saudu.net/ David

    In part due to similar circumstances in the past, I will almost never purchase a vehicle ‘off the lot’ at any dealership. Instead, I negotiate up front for exactly the vehicle I want and order it direct from the factory. Granted, this adds time to the purchase process, but I am certain of receiving exactly the vehicle I want at the price specified. I have done this once at a Saturn dealership and once at a Chrysler/Jeep dealership.

    Maybe it would be cheaper and better in the long run if everybody special-ordered their car instead of settling for what’s on the lot.

  • http://www.saudu.net David

    In part due to similar circumstances in the past, I will almost never purchase a vehicle ‘off the lot’ at any dealership. Instead, I negotiate up front for exactly the vehicle I want and order it direct from the factory. Granted, this adds time to the purchase process, but I am certain of receiving exactly the vehicle I want at the price specified. I have done this once at a Saturn dealership and once at a Chrysler/Jeep dealership.

    Maybe it would be cheaper and better in the long run if everybody special-ordered their car instead of settling for what’s on the lot.

  • jules

    When I got my first job, I bought a used Ford from a dealer in Dallas. They called me after the paperwork was signed and before I had picked up the car, to add more charges. I balked and said absolutely not — and they threatened to call my boss and tell them I hadn’t finished college.

  • jules

    When I got my first job, I bought a used Ford from a dealer in Dallas. They called me after the paperwork was signed and before I had picked up the car, to add more charges. I balked and said absolutely not — and they threatened to call my boss and tell them I hadn’t finished college.

  • Scott

    I can definitely say that you will find those types of car salesmen/dealerships under any automaker, just like you can find good ones. We were treated horribly in getting our Toyota. Though we got the car we wanted and a decent price, we had to fight for it kicking and screaming the whole time. If my wife’s car wasn’t about to die, we would have gone someplace else. For our next car, we are doing it over the internet to bypass all the BS. The new Malibu is still a good car (proof that GM can get that part right if they try) – maybe you can find a dealer online that won’t play those games.

  • Scott

    I can definitely say that you will find those types of car salesmen/dealerships under any automaker, just like you can find good ones. We were treated horribly in getting our Toyota. Though we got the car we wanted and a decent price, we had to fight for it kicking and screaming the whole time. If my wife’s car wasn’t about to die, we would have gone someplace else. For our next car, we are doing it over the internet to bypass all the BS. The new Malibu is still a good car (proof that GM can get that part right if they try) – maybe you can find a dealer online that won’t play those games.

  • sehlat

    Buying a car NEW? You must be out of your mind. A new car loses a huge chunk of it’s value before you’ve even gone half a block down the street. Yes, there are risks buying used, but my Honda Civic Sedan came to me with 80K miles on it and it’s now up over 150 and still running “like new”, thanks to a mechanic I trust and maintenance carried out on the level of fulfilling a religious duty.

    Check out
    http://www.lewrockwell.com/north/north124.html and
    http://www.lewrockwell.com/north/north154.html

    and forget the Big-but-shrinking Three.

    • http://www.insignificantthoughts.com/ Vinny

      I will NEVER EVER EVER buy someone elses problems. Sorry. It may devalue quickly, but at least I know someone else didn’t run it into the ground.

  • sehlat

    Buying a car NEW? You must be out of your mind. A new car loses a huge chunk of it’s value before you’ve even gone half a block down the street. Yes, there are risks buying used, but my Honda Civic Sedan came to me with 80K miles on it and it’s now up over 150 and still running “like new”, thanks to a mechanic I trust and maintenance carried out on the level of fulfilling a religious duty.

    Check out
    http://www.lewrockwell.com/north/north124.html and
    http://www.lewrockwell.com/north/north154.html

    and forget the Big-but-shrinking Three.

    • http://www.insignificantthoughts.com Vinny

      I will NEVER EVER EVER buy someone elses problems. Sorry. It may devalue quickly, but at least I know someone else didn’t run it into the ground.

  • econobiker

    Sounds like they wanted to pawn off a lower model or less desired car than that in the show room.
    And the paperwork was never really DONE as evidenced by your statements:

    “Paperwork done, car signed for, I called GEICO and added it to my insurance and added our sales rep as an authorized contact so he could finalize the insurance. The car was now ours. We had to go back on Monday to sign the paperwork, talk to the finance guy to finalize the deal, and get our tradein appraised.”

    Paperwork done, and then you said go back Monday to sign the paperwork. So they could switch the car anytime until you signed the “final” paperwork…

    • http://www.insignificantthoughts.com/ Vinny

      The financing paperwork, not the purchase. It was in writing and we signed. I just happen to have a carbon copy of it all. Nope, they effed up.

  • econobiker

    Sounds like they wanted to pawn off a lower model or less desired car than that in the show room.
    And the paperwork was never really DONE as evidenced by your statements:

    “Paperwork done, car signed for, I called GEICO and added it to my insurance and added our sales rep as an authorized contact so he could finalize the insurance. The car was now ours. We had to go back on Monday to sign the paperwork, talk to the finance guy to finalize the deal, and get our tradein appraised.”

    Paperwork done, and then you said go back Monday to sign the paperwork. So they could switch the car anytime until you signed the “final” paperwork…

    • http://www.insignificantthoughts.com Vinny

      The financing paperwork, not the purchase. It was in writing and we signed. I just happen to have a carbon copy of it all. Nope, they effed up.

  • Jack

    There are good Chevy dealers out there. I was buying a Malibu Maxx as a cash deal about four years ago. The dealer looked around and transhipped a car from another dealer with the accessories I wanted. I got a good discount, and a rebate. (I had a GM card rebate as well). We had most of the paperwork done, when the salesman suggested I go talk to the finance manager. I had visions of problems like those discussed above…

    In reality, they showed me an additional $1500 rebate that could be applied if I financed. No prepayment penalty. So I financed. First bill came, I called GMAC for a payoff amount, sent the check, and all set. Odd business model, but it worked for me.

  • Jack

    There are good Chevy dealers out there. I was buying a Malibu Maxx as a cash deal about four years ago. The dealer looked around and transhipped a car from another dealer with the accessories I wanted. I got a good discount, and a rebate. (I had a GM card rebate as well). We had most of the paperwork done, when the salesman suggested I go talk to the finance manager. I had visions of problems like those discussed above…

    In reality, they showed me an additional $1500 rebate that could be applied if I financed. No prepayment penalty. So I financed. First bill came, I called GMAC for a payoff amount, sent the check, and all set. Odd business model, but it worked for me.

  • oldie

    Uh oh. Curry… what a bunch of con men… I bought a car from there years ago. They never got the alarm right – and it went off in the middle of the night in an apartment complex. They claimed a timing chain problem – after 5k. They suck. I traded that car in within 18 mos. I hated that dealership that much.

    So much for change.

  • oldie

    Uh oh. Curry… what a bunch of con men… I bought a car from there years ago. They never got the alarm right – and it went off in the middle of the night in an apartment complex. They claimed a timing chain problem – after 5k. They suck. I traded that car in within 18 mos. I hated that dealership that much.

    So much for change.

  • jp

    I bought a new suv for myself last feb. and a new car for my wife last march. after hitting every new car dealer in palm beach county we went with Hyundai, best car for the $ and the actual purchase process was so painless and fast it was funny. no lies no games, this is what i’m willing to pay will you accept that ? 5 min later signed and done. the aggravation we went thru in GM ford and Chrysler dealerships just trying to get information about the cars and take a test drive was retarded. so the imports make a better product and provide better service.

  • jp

    I bought a new suv for myself last feb. and a new car for my wife last march. after hitting every new car dealer in palm beach county we went with Hyundai, best car for the $ and the actual purchase process was so painless and fast it was funny. no lies no games, this is what i’m willing to pay will you accept that ? 5 min later signed and done. the aggravation we went thru in GM ford and Chrysler dealerships just trying to get information about the cars and take a test drive was retarded. so the imports make a better product and provide better service.

  • Chris

    There’s nothing wrong with buying a used car, *if* you know how to go about it. The best thing any individual can do is to fully educate themselves before buying anything of appreciable value. If you know what to look for in a used car, and where to look for it, you can save yourself ENORMOUS amounts of money and still wind up with a reliable vehicle.

    • http://www.insignificantthoughts.com/ Vinny

      If that works for you, go for it. I’ve had too many issues with aged cars to buy someone else’s aged vehicles, but that’s me. If it works for you, carry on then!

  • Chris

    There’s nothing wrong with buying a used car, *if* you know how to go about it. The best thing any individual can do is to fully educate themselves before buying anything of appreciable value. If you know what to look for in a used car, and where to look for it, you can save yourself ENORMOUS amounts of money and still wind up with a reliable vehicle.

    • http://www.insignificantthoughts.com Vinny

      If that works for you, go for it. I’ve had too many issues with aged cars to buy someone else’s aged vehicles, but that’s me. If it works for you, carry on then!

  • VR
  • VR
  • http://blogs.cars.com/ Dave T.

    Hey there,
    I’m an editor at Cars.com and these stories are not unheard of and are truly disappointing. I’d also agree with others, it’s not just a domestic issue.

    Anyway, I thought I’d weigh in on some alternatives. While the Honda Accord is probably the best in this class I’d say the ride might be a bit rough for what you’re looking for, although the seats are fantastic.

    Also try the 2010 Ford Fusion if you’re not totally turned off domestics. It’ll be less and is a terrific highway cruiser (I drove it from Detroit to Chicago).

    Hyundai Sonata is also worth checking out.

    I’m not as much a fan of the Camry, Altima and Mazda6 for various reasons. But if you’re into a sportier ride the 6 is very nice too.

    The best part is, all of these cars should have deals on them, with the exception of the new Fusion.

    Good luck with finding a new car.

  • http://blogs.cars.com Dave T.

    Hey there,
    I’m an editor at Cars.com and these stories are not unheard of and are truly disappointing. I’d also agree with others, it’s not just a domestic issue.

    Anyway, I thought I’d weigh in on some alternatives. While the Honda Accord is probably the best in this class I’d say the ride might be a bit rough for what you’re looking for, although the seats are fantastic.

    Also try the 2010 Ford Fusion if you’re not totally turned off domestics. It’ll be less and is a terrific highway cruiser (I drove it from Detroit to Chicago).

    Hyundai Sonata is also worth checking out.

    I’m not as much a fan of the Camry, Altima and Mazda6 for various reasons. But if you’re into a sportier ride the 6 is very nice too.

    The best part is, all of these cars should have deals on them, with the exception of the new Fusion.

    Good luck with finding a new car.

  • BH

    I’ve bought 3 new cars and had issues purchasing all three. With the first car they charged me $1,000 for a CD changer you could get in the aftermarket for about $500 installed. With the second car the sales guy just annoyed the crap out of us and when we went to pick up the car it didn’t have the one thing we specifically asked for – a CD player, which meant we had to wait an additional 3 days. The third purchase went very smoothly because we paid cash and didn’t want any extras, but they really pushed the extended warranty (for $1600, which I knew from research at the time that I could have bought from another Honda dealer for $875 if I really wanted it). Part of the hard sell was having us sign a document attesting to the fact that we were refusing the extended warranty and understood the consequences.

    Short version of all of this is that I absolutely hate buying cars. My current car is 9 years old and I have no intention of replacing it until it falls apart around me. I always research my purchases ahead of time, so I know exactly what I want when I walk into a dealership. Because I do all the work ahead of time a dealer ends up making hundreds of dollars or more for 30 minutes of chit-chat and filling out some forms. What I really want is to be able to order exactly what I want on-line and go pick it up at a dealership a few weeks later. I’ll pay them a flat fee to handle paperwork (registration, title, insurance, etc.) and then drive it home.

  • BH

    I’ve bought 3 new cars and had issues purchasing all three. With the first car they charged me $1,000 for a CD changer you could get in the aftermarket for about $500 installed. With the second car the sales guy just annoyed the crap out of us and when we went to pick up the car it didn’t have the one thing we specifically asked for – a CD player, which meant we had to wait an additional 3 days. The third purchase went very smoothly because we paid cash and didn’t want any extras, but they really pushed the extended warranty (for $1600, which I knew from research at the time that I could have bought from another Honda dealer for $875 if I really wanted it). Part of the hard sell was having us sign a document attesting to the fact that we were refusing the extended warranty and understood the consequences.

    Short version of all of this is that I absolutely hate buying cars. My current car is 9 years old and I have no intention of replacing it until it falls apart around me. I always research my purchases ahead of time, so I know exactly what I want when I walk into a dealership. Because I do all the work ahead of time a dealer ends up making hundreds of dollars or more for 30 minutes of chit-chat and filling out some forms. What I really want is to be able to order exactly what I want on-line and go pick it up at a dealership a few weeks later. I’ll pay them a flat fee to handle paperwork (registration, title, insurance, etc.) and then drive it home.

  • Charlie

    I have purchased 4 used cars, 3 new, and leased 1. The short story is I have been VERY happy with a car I purchased 7 years ago 8 months old with 14k miles. I count it among my best purchases.

    The first 3 used cars I purchased were VERY old, 2 older than me. They required a great deal of work. I paid $75 for the first car and scrapped it 3 months and about 100 hours of labor later (it broke 2 days after I would fix it. When it was new car and driver, Auto trend, and most of the magazines ranked it very highly (car of the year). Car and Driver has since apologized in a recent article.

    The other 2 cars were worth the effort (1974 BMW 2002), but I haven’t had the time for something like that in a very long time.

    I have purchased cars new since my wonderful used purchase, but every time I ended up feeling like I paid too much, greatly reducing my enjoyment.

  • Charlie

    I have purchased 4 used cars, 3 new, and leased 1. The short story is I have been VERY happy with a car I purchased 7 years ago 8 months old with 14k miles. I count it among my best purchases.

    The first 3 used cars I purchased were VERY old, 2 older than me. They required a great deal of work. I paid $75 for the first car and scrapped it 3 months and about 100 hours of labor later (it broke 2 days after I would fix it. When it was new car and driver, Auto trend, and most of the magazines ranked it very highly (car of the year). Car and Driver has since apologized in a recent article.

    The other 2 cars were worth the effort (1974 BMW 2002), but I haven’t had the time for something like that in a very long time.

    I have purchased cars new since my wonderful used purchase, but every time I ended up feeling like I paid too much, greatly reducing my enjoyment.

  • ZZ1

    “Buying someone else’s problems”?

    What the heck are you talking about? Haven’t you heard of a “mechanic’s inspection”?

    If you buy a new car you are just a chump paying thousands of dollard too much for a nice smell. Used is the only sensible way to go unless you’re a millionaire.

    • http://www.insignificantthoughts.com/ Vinny

      Dude. I didn’t insult you, don’t insult me. If it works for you, go right ahead. Have fun. Enjoy.

      Just because it works for you doesn’t mean it’s the only right way to do things.

  • ZZ1

    “Buying someone else’s problems”?

    What the heck are you talking about? Haven’t you heard of a “mechanic’s inspection”?

    If you buy a new car you are just a chump paying thousands of dollard too much for a nice smell. Used is the only sensible way to go unless you’re a millionaire.

    • http://www.insignificantthoughts.com Vinny

      Dude. I didn’t insult you, don’t insult me. If it works for you, go right ahead. Have fun. Enjoy.

      Just because it works for you doesn’t mean it’s the only right way to do things.

  • ZZ1

    I fail to see how taking $20K out of the bank and immediately ripping up a third of it is one possible “right way to do things”.

    People buying cars they can’t afford is one of the reasons the economy is tanking.

  • ZZ1

    I fail to see how taking $20K out of the bank and immediately ripping up a third of it is one possible “right way to do things”.

    People buying cars they can’t afford is one of the reasons the economy is tanking.

  • http://www.insignificantthoughts.com/ Vinny

    Yes. People buying $350,000 homes on $25k a year salaries are the reason the economy is tanking, not because people who make good money are buying cars. Can you stop making assumptions about me already?

    Jesus.

  • http://www.insignificantthoughts.com Vinny

    Yes. People buying $350,000 homes on $25k a year salaries are the reason the economy is tanking, not because people who make good money are buying cars. Can you stop making assumptions about me already?

    Jesus.

  • Curtis

    Some of your story doesn’t make sense.

    You say the first day: “Paperwork done, car signed for, I called GEICO and added it to my insurance and added our sales rep as an authorized contact so he could finalize the insurance. The car was now ours.” also you say the next day: “Then, on the way home, it hit me. I had added that new car to our insurance policy. As far as GEICO was concerned, that car was insured by me! Someone drove the car off the lot with insurance coverage I was paying for!”.

    Yet than you claim to be furious the second day because after you got home: “I came home and immediately called GEICO to have the car removed. This was at 8:50pm. I checked my e-mails and saw that we had gotten a voicemail at 8:40. It was from GEICO congratulating us on the purchase of our new car and wanting to confirm the details with us”. It sounds like you yourself talked to Geico and placed coverage on the car.

    The car dealer employees may be crooked but stood to gain nothing by calling Geico after you backed out of the deal and confirming insurance coverage on a car they had sold someone else. It would have just been extra work for no reward, placing insurance on a car you haven’t bought in no way firms a deal up. The only reason a dealership confirms insurance is to perfect the banks contract for them.

    • http://www.insignificantthoughts.com/ Vinny

      1: The VIN was the one they added in replacement for the one they couldn’t sell me (ie: not the one from Sunday, the one from Monday night). That was done without my consent after I told her I was leaving and wantyed a refund. The insured car was the one I thought we bought and gave the VIN for on Sunday.

      2: Actually, you’re wrong. They had a lot to gain. They knew I was coming back today to get my deposit back. I’m sure it would’ve been a huge haggling session to get that refund while they tried to sell me on a car that was “already insured, so why not take it for a spin?” That’s how these folks do business. They weren’t confirming insurance, they were writing a deal they were not authorized to do and couldn’t do it without that car being covered by my policy.

      That’s the story and I hope it clears things up for you.

  • Curtis

    Some of your story doesn’t make sense.

    You say the first day: “Paperwork done, car signed for, I called GEICO and added it to my insurance and added our sales rep as an authorized contact so he could finalize the insurance. The car was now ours.” also you say the next day: “Then, on the way home, it hit me. I had added that new car to our insurance policy. As far as GEICO was concerned, that car was insured by me! Someone drove the car off the lot with insurance coverage I was paying for!”.

    Yet than you claim to be furious the second day because after you got home: “I came home and immediately called GEICO to have the car removed. This was at 8:50pm. I checked my e-mails and saw that we had gotten a voicemail at 8:40. It was from GEICO congratulating us on the purchase of our new car and wanting to confirm the details with us”. It sounds like you yourself talked to Geico and placed coverage on the car.

    The car dealer employees may be crooked but stood to gain nothing by calling Geico after you backed out of the deal and confirming insurance coverage on a car they had sold someone else. It would have just been extra work for no reward, placing insurance on a car you haven’t bought in no way firms a deal up. The only reason a dealership confirms insurance is to perfect the banks contract for them.

    • http://www.insignificantthoughts.com Vinny

      1: The VIN was the one they added in replacement for the one they couldn’t sell me (ie: not the one from Sunday, the one from Monday night). That was done without my consent after I told her I was leaving and wantyed a refund. The insured car was the one I thought we bought and gave the VIN for on Sunday.

      2: Actually, you’re wrong. They had a lot to gain. They knew I was coming back today to get my deposit back. I’m sure it would’ve been a huge haggling session to get that refund while they tried to sell me on a car that was “already insured, so why not take it for a spin?” That’s how these folks do business. They weren’t confirming insurance, they were writing a deal they were not authorized to do and couldn’t do it without that car being covered by my policy.

      That’s the story and I hope it clears things up for you.

  • http://www.futuregringo.com/ james

    I fall into the “would always USED over NEW” for the financial gain too, but that’s not the point or premise of the post – so who cares?

    I would not only be annoyed by these whole process – but at the wasted TIME as well. Shopping for cars sucks, and to be given the runaround like that when you could be allocating it to actual car searching would make me equally as furious…

    By the way I’m sure your Chevy Malibu will wind up with one of my Michigan relatives at some point. Seems everybody back home has at least one or knows someone who does.

  • http://www.futuregringo.com james

    I fall into the “would always USED over NEW” for the financial gain too, but that’s not the point or premise of the post – so who cares?

    I would not only be annoyed by these whole process – but at the wasted TIME as well. Shopping for cars sucks, and to be given the runaround like that when you could be allocating it to actual car searching would make me equally as furious…

    By the way I’m sure your Chevy Malibu will wind up with one of my Michigan relatives at some point. Seems everybody back home has at least one or knows someone who does.

  • J

    My wife and I bought a new 08 Escape Hybrid from an upperscale Ford dealership in Kailua, HI (had a GT for sale on the floor, authorized Saleen dealer, lots of Shelby’s, etc). We couldn’t have had a better experience, from beginning to end. They didn’t have exactly what we wanted when we came in, but the salesman was SO knowledgeable about the mechanics of the other model they had that I was completely comfortable with the difference in models (wanted 6cyl/awd, got hybrid/fwd). They were polite, up-front, non-pushy, and very accommodating to our needs (I was post-surgery, so moving slowly around the dealership, tired, etc). Because we hadn’t planned on buying that day, we didn’t have our checkbook for the deposit, but they still let us take the car and come back to pay the next week. I don’t know how much of this was normal, since this was my first time buying a new car, and I had done much less research on the Ford than other makes we’d looked at, but it was a wonderful experience and my wife and I can’t say enough good things about it. Also, this has been the first SUV I’ve driven that I hasn’t driven me crazy. My other car is a smaller german sports car, so that I can stand to drive this SUV speaks volumes to my friends and family.

  • J

    My wife and I bought a new 08 Escape Hybrid from an upperscale Ford dealership in Kailua, HI (had a GT for sale on the floor, authorized Saleen dealer, lots of Shelby’s, etc). We couldn’t have had a better experience, from beginning to end. They didn’t have exactly what we wanted when we came in, but the salesman was SO knowledgeable about the mechanics of the other model they had that I was completely comfortable with the difference in models (wanted 6cyl/awd, got hybrid/fwd). They were polite, up-front, non-pushy, and very accommodating to our needs (I was post-surgery, so moving slowly around the dealership, tired, etc). Because we hadn’t planned on buying that day, we didn’t have our checkbook for the deposit, but they still let us take the car and come back to pay the next week. I don’t know how much of this was normal, since this was my first time buying a new car, and I had done much less research on the Ford than other makes we’d looked at, but it was a wonderful experience and my wife and I can’t say enough good things about it. Also, this has been the first SUV I’ve driven that I hasn’t driven me crazy. My other car is a smaller german sports car, so that I can stand to drive this SUV speaks volumes to my friends and family.

  • eddie_hazel

    Your story is completely believeable. Here’s the Reader’s Digest version of mine from nearby White Plains Honda.

    Me = buy the cheapest 2-door coupe Civic, don’t want any options or additional charges. Sat there reading a newspaper while the guy wrote it up, wearing a T shirt and gym shorts. All I want is good gas mileage and a reliable, safe car.

    White Plains Honda = you’ll need extended extra value package, extended warranty, VIN etching, 7 point alarm, and – mid spiel he grabs a fax and says “you’ll want Lojack. When a car goes missing, the first thing they ask is, Do they have Lojack”. Over time, the options/profit margin would have cost more than the car!

    I got to “if you suggest one more thing, I will walk away”.

    Oh yeah in terms of trade-in – having a small dent on the side panel of your car – i.e., something that no one buying a 5-10 year old car would care about whatsoever – will knock its trade-in value down from say $3000 to $500 because “we have to get the whole panel fixed”.

  • eddie_hazel

    Your story is completely believeable. Here’s the Reader’s Digest version of mine from nearby White Plains Honda.

    Me = buy the cheapest 2-door coupe Civic, don’t want any options or additional charges. Sat there reading a newspaper while the guy wrote it up, wearing a T shirt and gym shorts. All I want is good gas mileage and a reliable, safe car.

    White Plains Honda = you’ll need extended extra value package, extended warranty, VIN etching, 7 point alarm, and – mid spiel he grabs a fax and says “you’ll want Lojack. When a car goes missing, the first thing they ask is, Do they have Lojack”. Over time, the options/profit margin would have cost more than the car!

    I got to “if you suggest one more thing, I will walk away”.

    Oh yeah in terms of trade-in – having a small dent on the side panel of your car – i.e., something that no one buying a 5-10 year old car would care about whatsoever – will knock its trade-in value down from say $3000 to $500 because “we have to get the whole panel fixed”.

  • Ragnar

    Yeah, I bought a 2009 Altima Coupe 2.5s from a Nissan dealer, and I got a great deal on it too. I love the car, looks great and drives fast. I would recommend it if you do highway driving. I have the 6-speed manual and boy it just coasts along doing 65mph in 6th.

    The first dealer started to give me crap about lowering the price, I went to another dealer and they happily took 1,500$ off of the MSRP for me.

  • Ragnar

    Yeah, I bought a 2009 Altima Coupe 2.5s from a Nissan dealer, and I got a great deal on it too. I love the car, looks great and drives fast. I would recommend it if you do highway driving. I have the 6-speed manual and boy it just coasts along doing 65mph in 6th.

    The first dealer started to give me crap about lowering the price, I went to another dealer and they happily took 1,500$ off of the MSRP for me.

  • Richard

    I’ve had beater cars, new cars and slightly used cars.

    The sweet spot for me is a one/two year old car that still has a few years of factory warranty. That avoids the biggest first year of depreciation. Everybody has a reason for selling. The morons that bought $350k houses on $25k/yr incomes also bought cars they couldn’t afford.

    Also, smart people lose jobs too – or get knocked up while owning a two seater convertible. That’s where my 1yo Z3 came from! :)

    From my experience, you can have problems with new cars too.

    My new 1995 Saturn had front brake problems to the point that I started the lemon law process and they got me a new one. I heard every excuse in the book about why the brakes were pulsating. I knew they were bullshit because they couldn’t remember the lies from visit to visit. The new one had brake problems too… until I took it to an independent brake shop and they did it right. That car lasted ten years for me and never stranded me, but it was a pain in the ass in the first year of ownership.

    Buying a used car w/o a warranty means you have nobody to blame but yourself when/if it blows up on you. That’s exactly what will be bought when my sons start to drive because they’ll probably trash it.

  • Richard

    I’ve had beater cars, new cars and slightly used cars.

    The sweet spot for me is a one/two year old car that still has a few years of factory warranty. That avoids the biggest first year of depreciation. Everybody has a reason for selling. The morons that bought $350k houses on $25k/yr incomes also bought cars they couldn’t afford.

    Also, smart people lose jobs too – or get knocked up while owning a two seater convertible. That’s where my 1yo Z3 came from! :)

    From my experience, you can have problems with new cars too.

    My new 1995 Saturn had front brake problems to the point that I started the lemon law process and they got me a new one. I heard every excuse in the book about why the brakes were pulsating. I knew they were bullshit because they couldn’t remember the lies from visit to visit. The new one had brake problems too… until I took it to an independent brake shop and they did it right. That car lasted ten years for me and never stranded me, but it was a pain in the ass in the first year of ownership.

    Buying a used car w/o a warranty means you have nobody to blame but yourself when/if it blows up on you. That’s exactly what will be bought when my sons start to drive because they’ll probably trash it.

  • Donald Carlson

    I sold cars back in the early 80′s and got out because I hated shady tactics. That said, this dealer was pretty sloppy about inventory. In those days each car had a card that was kept in a filing area — if the card was in the file, it was for sale, if it was out, that meant the car was either sold (and the card was with the paperwork) or another salesman had the card and was negotiating a deal on the car. If it sold, the card went with the buyer’s order unless it fell through for any reason, then it was put back in the file. Also, as soon as a deal was made on the car — even before financing was aquired – it went on a board as a sold unit, and other salesmen would check the board for that inventory number to see if car had been sold that day. We never sold an already sold unit to another customer. Never. And this was way before computers were common.

    I have had cars sold after showing a car and the potential buyers left, and I’ve shown people a car that was found to be sold before we negotiated on it. I had several deals where the “dealer locator” was used to find an identical or extremely similar car. One time it was a El Camino this guy wanted in a certain color and interior, and a dealer not a far drive off had it. I told him to go look at in on Sunday, he did, and we got it in for him on Monday. Our dealership once dealer traded on a Corvette that was in Nevada, the dealer in Texas. They sent a flat bet out to get it. Usually there wasn’t any additional cost to this, though the Nevada car buyer did pay more for this car than he would have had it been in inventory.

    The point I’m making is you were handled extremely poorly, and you rightfully walked away from this “mouse house.” If they treat you like this before the sale, then you could never trust their service or body shop or anything.

    Good hunting.

  • Donald Carlson

    I sold cars back in the early 80′s and got out because I hated shady tactics. That said, this dealer was pretty sloppy about inventory. In those days each car had a card that was kept in a filing area — if the card was in the file, it was for sale, if it was out, that meant the car was either sold (and the card was with the paperwork) or another salesman had the card and was negotiating a deal on the car. If it sold, the card went with the buyer’s order unless it fell through for any reason, then it was put back in the file. Also, as soon as a deal was made on the car — even before financing was aquired – it went on a board as a sold unit, and other salesmen would check the board for that inventory number to see if car had been sold that day. We never sold an already sold unit to another customer. Never. And this was way before computers were common.

    I have had cars sold after showing a car and the potential buyers left, and I’ve shown people a car that was found to be sold before we negotiated on it. I had several deals where the “dealer locator” was used to find an identical or extremely similar car. One time it was a El Camino this guy wanted in a certain color and interior, and a dealer not a far drive off had it. I told him to go look at in on Sunday, he did, and we got it in for him on Monday. Our dealership once dealer traded on a Corvette that was in Nevada, the dealer in Texas. They sent a flat bet out to get it. Usually there wasn’t any additional cost to this, though the Nevada car buyer did pay more for this car than he would have had it been in inventory.

    The point I’m making is you were handled extremely poorly, and you rightfully walked away from this “mouse house.” If they treat you like this before the sale, then you could never trust their service or body shop or anything.

    Good hunting.

  • Mike

    Guys, never forget one simple thing. You can sign a lot of papers, but unless you have taken the delivery of the car, all that paper is just paper. Same way that it was written up, it can be torn up. You didn’t like cars aura or the smell or etc and you can walk away from it for whatever reason at least in Wisconsin.

  • Mike

    Guys, never forget one simple thing. You can sign a lot of papers, but unless you have taken the delivery of the car, all that paper is just paper. Same way that it was written up, it can be torn up. You didn’t like cars aura or the smell or etc and you can walk away from it for whatever reason at least in Wisconsin.

  • beverly marksman

    There is a 72 hour cancellation on any purchase contract in New York, New Jersey and many other states.

  • beverly marksman

    There is a 72 hour cancellation on any purchase contract in New York, New Jersey and many other states.

  • http://www.saudu.net/ David

    Obviously a lot of ill feeling both ways when talking about buying new vs buying used. In my own case, every single used car I ever purchased, including a number from reputable manufacturers’ dealers, had problems. In almost every case, I was forced to spend as much as $1500 within 6 months to make some major repair that was hidden from me at purchase either through deceptive salesmanship or simple ignorance of the issues the vehicle had.

    The last used car I purchased was a 1986 Oldsmobile Toronado with the sports package that I purchased in 1992. The fact that this car was only 6 years old and had only 35,000 miles on it made me feel like I was getting a good deal. For just shy of 6 months I absolutely LOVED the car. However, before that first 6 months was out, I had an engine indicator come up telling me I had a major problem. If I remember correctly, it was giving me a false temperature reading. I took the car back for service, and they tried to charge me $400 to replace a broken sensor… telling me that because the connector had been ‘glued in’ with a vinyl sealant, that I had incorrectly repaired the sensor and voided the service contract. Naturally I explained that I had never touched the sensor and they had to acknowledge that the sealant appeared to be at least 6 months old; prior to my purchase.
    The replaced the sensor and sent me on my way, but guess what? Yup, 3 months later I’m back–with the same sensor broken. This went on for 6 more months, taking the car in almost every 6 to 12 weeks due to a broken sensor that they couldn’t prevent from breaking. It wasn’t until I insisted they splice an extra length of wire onto the connector that the problem went away.

    Point? If I’d had to pay for every sensor replacement, I’d have spent over $2000 inside of a year over and above the purchase of that used car.

    Since then I’ve bought nothing but new. I put over $175,000 miles on a ’96 Camaro and over $110,000 miles on a 2002 Saturn Vue; with no major issues worth speaking of before they were retired. I now own a Jeep Wrangler that I custom ordered from our local dealership and I’ve not had to go back to the dealer for anything more than scheduled maintenance. For me, buying new has given me peace of mind and no unexpected costs since purchase. If you ask me, buying new was well worth the added up-front expense.

  • http://www.saudu.net David

    Obviously a lot of ill feeling both ways when talking about buying new vs buying used. In my own case, every single used car I ever purchased, including a number from reputable manufacturers’ dealers, had problems. In almost every case, I was forced to spend as much as $1500 within 6 months to make some major repair that was hidden from me at purchase either through deceptive salesmanship or simple ignorance of the issues the vehicle had.

    The last used car I purchased was a 1986 Oldsmobile Toronado with the sports package that I purchased in 1992. The fact that this car was only 6 years old and had only 35,000 miles on it made me feel like I was getting a good deal. For just shy of 6 months I absolutely LOVED the car. However, before that first 6 months was out, I had an engine indicator come up telling me I had a major problem. If I remember correctly, it was giving me a false temperature reading. I took the car back for service, and they tried to charge me $400 to replace a broken sensor… telling me that because the connector had been ‘glued in’ with a vinyl sealant, that I had incorrectly repaired the sensor and voided the service contract. Naturally I explained that I had never touched the sensor and they had to acknowledge that the sealant appeared to be at least 6 months old; prior to my purchase.
    The replaced the sensor and sent me on my way, but guess what? Yup, 3 months later I’m back–with the same sensor broken. This went on for 6 more months, taking the car in almost every 6 to 12 weeks due to a broken sensor that they couldn’t prevent from breaking. It wasn’t until I insisted they splice an extra length of wire onto the connector that the problem went away.

    Point? If I’d had to pay for every sensor replacement, I’d have spent over $2000 inside of a year over and above the purchase of that used car.

    Since then I’ve bought nothing but new. I put over $175,000 miles on a ’96 Camaro and over $110,000 miles on a 2002 Saturn Vue; with no major issues worth speaking of before they were retired. I now own a Jeep Wrangler that I custom ordered from our local dealership and I’ve not had to go back to the dealer for anything more than scheduled maintenance. For me, buying new has given me peace of mind and no unexpected costs since purchase. If you ask me, buying new was well worth the added up-front expense.

  • Doc S

    This is precisely why I stopped buying domestic cars. When I was looking in 2002, I went to a dealer of one of the Big Three. Gave ‘em my requirements – 4 cylinder, ABS standard, hatchback, crossover or wagon – I was looking for something like the Matrix/Vibe, RAV4, Mazda Protege, Subaru Outback, etc. They kept trying to put me in a 6-cyl. truck-body SUV. Every time I asked about their 4-banger commuter/grocery getter, the salesdroid completely ignored me and started rambling about the benefits of their 4WD truckster. Ended up buying a CR-V that’s got 150K and still going strong.

    Contrast this with my latest – after a dozen test drives and weeks of research, I decided on a new 2009 VW Jetta. Walked in with the exact spec of the car, down to the color, and the price I wanted to pay – $95 over invoice. Had my credit score in hand. The local dealer didn’t have the exact car on the lot, so they did an inventory search, accepted the deal, and arranged for a stock transfer for the next day. I was in and out in less than two hours, with a 3.9% loan (two points better than our credit union) approved and ready to go on delivery.

    Great car, by the way, a real blast to drive.

  • Doc S

    This is precisely why I stopped buying domestic cars. When I was looking in 2002, I went to a dealer of one of the Big Three. Gave ‘em my requirements – 4 cylinder, ABS standard, hatchback, crossover or wagon – I was looking for something like the Matrix/Vibe, RAV4, Mazda Protege, Subaru Outback, etc. They kept trying to put me in a 6-cyl. truck-body SUV. Every time I asked about their 4-banger commuter/grocery getter, the salesdroid completely ignored me and started rambling about the benefits of their 4WD truckster. Ended up buying a CR-V that’s got 150K and still going strong.

    Contrast this with my latest – after a dozen test drives and weeks of research, I decided on a new 2009 VW Jetta. Walked in with the exact spec of the car, down to the color, and the price I wanted to pay – $95 over invoice. Had my credit score in hand. The local dealer didn’t have the exact car on the lot, so they did an inventory search, accepted the deal, and arranged for a stock transfer for the next day. I was in and out in less than two hours, with a 3.9% loan (two points better than our credit union) approved and ready to go on delivery.

    Great car, by the way, a real blast to drive.

  • Matt

    I as well as the first reply, have sold cars before.

    This is what happens at smaller dealerships more commonly, but all of them do it to be honest. Shitty salespeople do this. I earned my sales by being honest and a good guy. Problem is, the more sincere you are, the more people are suspicious. Vice versa is also true, the more you lie and cheat and promise rainbows and treat people like they are crap, they love it sometimes. It’s truly ass-backwards and makes no sense to me (which is why I don’t sell them anymore nor desire to).

    I know not everyone wants to be bullheaded, but you absolutely should be extremely firm and inflexible with the salespeople. The reason they likely offered to “Eat the difference” on the trade was because of how much they were making off you with the original car. Probably somewheres in the 2+ grand range.

    a: never ever sign the deal the first day
    b: shop around the same car at a minimum of 5 dealerships in the area
    c: make every dealership from b give you an offer IN WRITING
    d: research discounts, invoice prices online

    be prepared to do the same when it comes to maintenance, the same dealership could have nice salespeople and horrible service.

    Oh, and none of this will reach the manager. The only way to truly get a dealership to listen is to go straight to the OWNER of the dealership. That’s the only person can that can make the decisions they have convinced you that the salespeople can make.

  • Matt

    I as well as the first reply, have sold cars before.

    This is what happens at smaller dealerships more commonly, but all of them do it to be honest. Shitty salespeople do this. I earned my sales by being honest and a good guy. Problem is, the more sincere you are, the more people are suspicious. Vice versa is also true, the more you lie and cheat and promise rainbows and treat people like they are crap, they love it sometimes. It’s truly ass-backwards and makes no sense to me (which is why I don’t sell them anymore nor desire to).

    I know not everyone wants to be bullheaded, but you absolutely should be extremely firm and inflexible with the salespeople. The reason they likely offered to “Eat the difference” on the trade was because of how much they were making off you with the original car. Probably somewheres in the 2+ grand range.

    a: never ever sign the deal the first day
    b: shop around the same car at a minimum of 5 dealerships in the area
    c: make every dealership from b give you an offer IN WRITING
    d: research discounts, invoice prices online

    be prepared to do the same when it comes to maintenance, the same dealership could have nice salespeople and horrible service.

    Oh, and none of this will reach the manager. The only way to truly get a dealership to listen is to go straight to the OWNER of the dealership. That’s the only person can that can make the decisions they have convinced you that the salespeople can make.

  • KCChiefsFan

    If the money isn’t back in your account by noon today, I’d go to a local news station, tell them my story was on the consumerist (then explain what it is if they were clueless) and ask to be on the nightly news.

    What I’d do next, and this is just me, is go in and have that deal nullified. Then, I’d work out a deal with the foreign car dealership across the street (or next door. If your city is like mine, the dealerships are side by side) to let the aforementioned nightly news crew follow me into the showroom, and make them look like heroes, in exchange for a discount on a car. I wonder what that kind of publicity, combined with that kind of enormous dig against a local competitor would be worth to a car dealership. I’m willing to bet the figure is something like 15-20% off.

    That’s just me though. I have no problem fighting morally gray with morally gray, especially if it saves me money and exposes shysters for the scum they are.

  • KCChiefsFan

    If the money isn’t back in your account by noon today, I’d go to a local news station, tell them my story was on the consumerist (then explain what it is if they were clueless) and ask to be on the nightly news.

    What I’d do next, and this is just me, is go in and have that deal nullified. Then, I’d work out a deal with the foreign car dealership across the street (or next door. If your city is like mine, the dealerships are side by side) to let the aforementioned nightly news crew follow me into the showroom, and make them look like heroes, in exchange for a discount on a car. I wonder what that kind of publicity, combined with that kind of enormous dig against a local competitor would be worth to a car dealership. I’m willing to bet the figure is something like 15-20% off.

    That’s just me though. I have no problem fighting morally gray with morally gray, especially if it saves me money and exposes shysters for the scum they are.

  • Jonathan

    I hate these stories. I’m sorry to hear about that. I live in Cincinnati and bought a Honda Element used from Performance Honda. I was a new buyer, and had been turned down all over the place cause of my relatively short credit life. I didn’t think I’d be able to get a car from Performance Honda because it was so nice looking on the inside, but the salesperson I spoke to was very friendly and answered any and all questions I had and helped me get the car I wanted.

  • Jonathan

    I hate these stories. I’m sorry to hear about that. I live in Cincinnati and bought a Honda Element used from Performance Honda. I was a new buyer, and had been turned down all over the place cause of my relatively short credit life. I didn’t think I’d be able to get a car from Performance Honda because it was so nice looking on the inside, but the salesperson I spoke to was very friendly and answered any and all questions I had and helped me get the car I wanted.

  • doug

    Honda. Do it.

    ’nuff said.

  • doug

    Honda. Do it.

    ’nuff said.

  • ds

    Just wanted to chime in with another non-horror story. Back in 2003 I was hunting for a rear-drive coupe, and I came across a 2001 Camaro in PA with 6,799 miles on it, and it was being offered for 12,900. First thing I thought was that it was a misprint, so I called the dealer (Reedman-Toll in Langhorne) to confirm that, yes, someone decided to buy a fun car and not drive it, then sell it. After getting a quick description of the car (color I wanted [since the picture hadn't even made it to the website yet], RS, auto, 3.42), I’d asked if they could hold onto it for me until the next day. This was literally the only time I had any sort of difficulty with the dealer (minimal as it is), I had to ask nicely twice, and they did.

    I showed up at the dealer the next night, at around 8 PM. Walked in, and the salesperson who I spoke to was available right away. He brought me out to the car (didn’t try to show me anything else!), and said, “Let’s take it out to the test track.” Though not a track in the strictest sense (it was basically a private road inside the dealership), he brought us (my girlfriend and I) to a small hut, where he got out and told me to have a go. First, I’d never gotten this kind of treatment by a dealer (everywhere else I went would stay in the car with you, never let you out of their sight), and, second, I hadn’t been asked anything about purchasing, financing, warranty, extras, or anything other than friendly conversation. I took the car around the track four or five times and fell in love. After that, he brought us to their “garage” (which was more like an airplane hangar, replete with white floors and bright lighting) to inspect the car. After a thorough look, I’d made my decision.

    So, we headed back to the dealership building, me glowing, my salesperson still making nought but friendly conversation. We headed back in, and, with absolutely no pressure, told him that we wanted the car tonight (no salesman tactics whatsoever, an absolute miracle). While they were writing up the paperwork (no surprises, by the way), we were able to relax and wait in a huge room with a big-screen TV, popcorn and theatre seats, and The Simpsons were on (just a cherry on top for the night). Once they’d finished the papers, they called us in. Keep in mind, at no point were we pressured into any financing, extras or any other ploys to have us part with our money. I set up financing (at a special rate [3.9%] since the car was still under factory warranty), and asked to purchase extended coverage (which, in my rare case, did pay for itself after a fuel pump and a handful of other things) and LoJack (it’s a flashy automobile, and it bumped my insurance down), they took care of registration, and I had the keys in my hand by 10 PM. No pain, no pressure, just happy the whole way through.

    Keep in mind, at the time, I was working for a very customer service-oriented retailer (2 clues: a type of fruit and the letter i are involved), and I was amazed to see a comparable level of service being given for a notoriously shady segment of the market (and, no, I don’t work for the dealer, or in car sales any shape or form). I hope they’re keeping up the good work out there.

  • http://www.1nvader.com/ ds

    Just wanted to chime in with another non-horror story. Back in 2003 I was hunting for a rear-drive coupe, and I came across a 2001 Camaro in PA with 6,799 miles on it, and it was being offered for 12,900. First thing I thought was that it was a misprint, so I called the dealer (Reedman-Toll in Langhorne) to confirm that, yes, someone decided to buy a fun car and not drive it, then sell it. After getting a quick description of the car (color I wanted [since the picture hadn't even made it to the website yet], RS, auto, 3.42), I’d asked if they could hold onto it for me until the next day. This was literally the only time I had any sort of difficulty with the dealer (minimal as it is), I had to ask nicely twice, and they did.

    I showed up at the dealer the next night, at around 8 PM. Walked in, and the salesperson who I spoke to was available right away. He brought me out to the car (didn’t try to show me anything else!), and said, “Let’s take it out to the test track.” Though not a track in the strictest sense (it was basically a private road inside the dealership), he brought us (my girlfriend and I) to a small hut, where he got out and told me to have a go. First, I’d never gotten this kind of treatment by a dealer (everywhere else I went would stay in the car with you, never let you out of their sight), and, second, I hadn’t been asked anything about purchasing, financing, warranty, extras, or anything other than friendly conversation. I took the car around the track four or five times and fell in love. After that, he brought us to their “garage” (which was more like an airplane hangar, replete with white floors and bright lighting) to inspect the car. After a thorough look, I’d made my decision.

    So, we headed back to the dealership building, me glowing, my salesperson still making nought but friendly conversation. We headed back in, and, with absolutely no pressure, told him that we wanted the car tonight (no salesman tactics whatsoever, an absolute miracle). While they were writing up the paperwork (no surprises, by the way), we were able to relax and wait in a huge room with a big-screen TV, popcorn and theatre seats, and The Simpsons were on (just a cherry on top for the night). Once they’d finished the papers, they called us in. Keep in mind, at no point were we pressured into any financing, extras or any other ploys to have us part with our money. I set up financing (at a special rate [3.9%] since the car was still under factory warranty), and asked to purchase extended coverage (which, in my rare case, did pay for itself after a fuel pump and a handful of other things) and LoJack (it’s a flashy automobile, and it bumped my insurance down), they took care of registration, and I had the keys in my hand by 10 PM. No pain, no pressure, just happy the whole way through.

    Keep in mind, at the time, I was working for a very customer service-oriented retailer (2 clues: a type of fruit and the letter i are involved), and I was amazed to see a comparable level of service being given for a notoriously shady segment of the market (and, no, I don’t work for the dealer, or in car sales any shape or form). I hope they’re keeping up the good work out there.

  • Jay

    So I know you are in the NY/NJ area. If you still want that Malibu go to Schumacher Chevrolet. We get almost all of our cars from them. The owner is always on the floor of the showroom and is friendly and helpful. In fact they were just on the news because there sales were actually up last year unlike the rest of the dealerships. http://wcbstv.com/watercooler/schumacher.chevrolet.little.2.895393.html

  • Jay

    So I know you are in the NY/NJ area. If you still want that Malibu go to Schumacher Chevrolet. We get almost all of our cars from them. The owner is always on the floor of the showroom and is friendly and helpful. In fact they were just on the news because there sales were actually up last year unlike the rest of the dealerships. http://wcbstv.com/watercooler/schumacher.chevrolet.little.2.895393.html

  • http://www.patgillen.net/ Pat Gillen

    I bought a Wrangler from Nalley Chrysler in Roswell, GA a few years back and almost walked away from the deal because of something like this. The salesman I had was new and he constantly had this “seasoned” salesman make sure he was doing everything correct. We shook hands on a deal, and he had me sign a piece of paper with the price we’d agreed to – so he could check with his bosses. I always talked about a walk-out price… one that included tax, tag, title, etc. This was during the employee pricing thing, and not many dealers were offering many deals below that ‘discount’ price. We negotiated our price in spite of the slimy salesperson who fought us the entire way. When we went into the finance office, I looked at the deal and the jerk salesguy had added 2 thousand bucks to the deal! When he was called in, he simply said “we just weren’t making enough on the deal…” What?! What happened to all of the forms we signed?

    We walked out, furious. I had just shook the owners hand before walking in that office, and now he was going to get a phone call. In the end, our original salesperson called and set it up w/out the other guy… and had he not been such a standup guy (that you could obviously tell he was quite annoyed by the jerk), we would have moved on. Enough said, I will never return to that dealer ever again.

  • http://www.patgillen.net Pat Gillen

    I bought a Wrangler from Nalley Chrysler in Roswell, GA a few years back and almost walked away from the deal because of something like this. The salesman I had was new and he constantly had this “seasoned” salesman make sure he was doing everything correct. We shook hands on a deal, and he had me sign a piece of paper with the price we’d agreed to – so he could check with his bosses. I always talked about a walk-out price… one that included tax, tag, title, etc. This was during the employee pricing thing, and not many dealers were offering many deals below that ‘discount’ price. We negotiated our price in spite of the slimy salesperson who fought us the entire way. When we went into the finance office, I looked at the deal and the jerk salesguy had added 2 thousand bucks to the deal! When he was called in, he simply said “we just weren’t making enough on the deal…” What?! What happened to all of the forms we signed?

    We walked out, furious. I had just shook the owners hand before walking in that office, and now he was going to get a phone call. In the end, our original salesperson called and set it up w/out the other guy… and had he not been such a standup guy (that you could obviously tell he was quite annoyed by the jerk), we would have moved on. Enough said, I will never return to that dealer ever again.

  • Jen

    I’ve had issues dealing with a Hyundai dealership before. My then-fiance (now husband) needed a car, and he really liked the Tiburon. We found one in the color he wanted with the features he thought he could afford, and he was ready to buy the car if they were willing to offer a reasonable price. The salesman came back with a price that we knew was too high, and said he absolutely couldn’t go any lower. We left, planning to keep looking for a similar model at another Hyundai dealership. I started looking around online when we got home and found the exact car we had tried to purchase listed online for significantly less than the salesman had quoted. We went back the next day and asked to talk to the online sales rep, but the original salesman spotted us and came over. I tried to tell the manager that we didn’t want to work with him, but since he “got” us first they wouldn’t let us work with anyone else. We ended up getting the car for the price we wanted, but I was annoyed that I had to do all the work to get the price down and the jerk who tried to screw us over got the commission.

  • Jen

    I’ve had issues dealing with a Hyundai dealership before. My then-fiance (now husband) needed a car, and he really liked the Tiburon. We found one in the color he wanted with the features he thought he could afford, and he was ready to buy the car if they were willing to offer a reasonable price. The salesman came back with a price that we knew was too high, and said he absolutely couldn’t go any lower. We left, planning to keep looking for a similar model at another Hyundai dealership. I started looking around online when we got home and found the exact car we had tried to purchase listed online for significantly less than the salesman had quoted. We went back the next day and asked to talk to the online sales rep, but the original salesman spotted us and came over. I tried to tell the manager that we didn’t want to work with him, but since he “got” us first they wouldn’t let us work with anyone else. We ended up getting the car for the price we wanted, but I was annoyed that I had to do all the work to get the price down and the jerk who tried to screw us over got the commission.

  • Richard

    Hey Jen,

    If giving the greasy salesman that commission bothered you that much, you should have walked. You still would have gotten the car.

    Those whores will do anything for a sale.

  • Richard

    Hey Jen,

    If giving the greasy salesman that commission bothered you that much, you should have walked. You still would have gotten the car.

    Those whores will do anything for a sale.

  • Chris

    I’ve never bought an american car, but one of the local GM dealerships had a 2005 Jaguar coupe that I desperately wanted… It was the right color, right options, and very low milage so I went down to take a look. It was the first time I’d been to a GM dealership, and it was the last. After taking a 10 minute test drive, the salesman said he was expecting someone in at the end of the day with a deposit, and that I had to sign right NOW otherwise he would “save” the car. I was ready to deal, and after negotiating a very good price (I knew that car was showroom eye candy, and that it was there meant they really shafted someone on a trade-in to get it) and after signing the paperwork, I was told I had to trade in my A8 or finance. I happen to LIKE my A8, and I certainly didn’t want to finance an asset that has depreciated $70,000 in 4 years and is still in free-fall, so the salesman disappeared with the contract. After waiting 20 minutes I got up to leave, and the salesman came back with a new “actual” contract (they claimed what I had signed was an offer, even though I had read the fine print and it was a Sales Contract) but now I had to pay for a mechanical inspection, detailing and undercoating, even though the car was still under the manufacturer’s warranty. I insisted the sale be subject to an inspection by a jaguar mechanic, and they refused. After 2 hours, I walked out of the dealership. 2 months later, that car is still there. The asking price has increased $4,000. These people are complete and utter idiots.

  • Chris

    I’ve never bought an american car, but one of the local GM dealerships had a 2005 Jaguar coupe that I desperately wanted… It was the right color, right options, and very low milage so I went down to take a look. It was the first time I’d been to a GM dealership, and it was the last. After taking a 10 minute test drive, the salesman said he was expecting someone in at the end of the day with a deposit, and that I had to sign right NOW otherwise he would “save” the car. I was ready to deal, and after negotiating a very good price (I knew that car was showroom eye candy, and that it was there meant they really shafted someone on a trade-in to get it) and after signing the paperwork, I was told I had to trade in my A8 or finance. I happen to LIKE my A8, and I certainly didn’t want to finance an asset that has depreciated $70,000 in 4 years and is still in free-fall, so the salesman disappeared with the contract. After waiting 20 minutes I got up to leave, and the salesman came back with a new “actual” contract (they claimed what I had signed was an offer, even though I had read the fine print and it was a Sales Contract) but now I had to pay for a mechanical inspection, detailing and undercoating, even though the car was still under the manufacturer’s warranty. I insisted the sale be subject to an inspection by a jaguar mechanic, and they refused. After 2 hours, I walked out of the dealership. 2 months later, that car is still there. The asking price has increased $4,000. These people are complete and utter idiots.

  • Bridget

    I can’t stand car dealers (even though I have family members that do that for a living). I just dealt with one two months ago when I bought my mustang. Granted, I am generally a new car only type of person, because I agree with you – at least I know the car wasn’t beat to death by the previous owner. This time I decided to get a certified used, because it was all I could afford right now. The car hasn’t given me any problems as of yet and I’m quite happy with it. (It also helps that Gary was a mechanic and can fix any problem that arises.)

    What pissed me off about my experience is that the dealer wouldn’t address me. He would only talk to Gary, even though Gary told him numerous times that *I* was the one buying the car – the final decision was up to me. Eventually I got sick of it and looked the guy flat in the face and had it out with him. “Just because I have a vagina doesn’t mean I don’t know shit about cars. Start talking to me or we are going to walk the fuck out of here and go somewhere else.” He very reluctantly started talking to me. Then he tried to convince me that I didn’t want a GT because it would be too much power for me – he said I would be just as happy in a V6. So again I had it out with him – “My boobs do not get in the way of my driving capabilities. I can drive this car better than you and most men I know. I want this fucking car right here. If my having breasts is getting in the way of you making a sale, let me know now so we can stop wasting our time here.” After that he didn’t want to negotiate on price with me. He only wanted to deal with Gary when it came to the numbers. Gary sat back and again let me handle it. In the end I walked out of there with the car I wanted and paid $4000 less than the asking price, bringing the car down to what I could afford with some financial comfort.

    I do know that I’ll never go to that dealer again – even though they are probably the largest and most popular dealer in my area, I would rather go to a small shithole and get treated with respect than deal with that guy again.

  • Bridget

    I can’t stand car dealers (even though I have family members that do that for a living). I just dealt with one two months ago when I bought my mustang. Granted, I am generally a new car only type of person, because I agree with you – at least I know the car wasn’t beat to death by the previous owner. This time I decided to get a certified used, because it was all I could afford right now. The car hasn’t given me any problems as of yet and I’m quite happy with it. (It also helps that Gary was a mechanic and can fix any problem that arises.)

    What pissed me off about my experience is that the dealer wouldn’t address me. He would only talk to Gary, even though Gary told him numerous times that *I* was the one buying the car – the final decision was up to me. Eventually I got sick of it and looked the guy flat in the face and had it out with him. “Just because I have a vagina doesn’t mean I don’t know shit about cars. Start talking to me or we are going to walk the fuck out of here and go somewhere else.” He very reluctantly started talking to me. Then he tried to convince me that I didn’t want a GT because it would be too much power for me – he said I would be just as happy in a V6. So again I had it out with him – “My boobs do not get in the way of my driving capabilities. I can drive this car better than you and most men I know. I want this fucking car right here. If my having breasts is getting in the way of you making a sale, let me know now so we can stop wasting our time here.” After that he didn’t want to negotiate on price with me. He only wanted to deal with Gary when it came to the numbers. Gary sat back and again let me handle it. In the end I walked out of there with the car I wanted and paid $4000 less than the asking price, bringing the car down to what I could afford with some financial comfort.

    I do know that I’ll never go to that dealer again – even though they are probably the largest and most popular dealer in my area, I would rather go to a small shithole and get treated with respect than deal with that guy again.

  • V. R.

    To those “you’re retarded for buying new” people: your blanket statements are, to use the parlance of our times, “teh fail.”

    I’m a well-educated engineer, I work on and fix cars. My friends and acquaintances ask me to go along with them to check out used cars. For my own most recent car, I didn’t have the $$ to buy new, so I bought a used one from a private party who met all my stringent criteria. Private parties are easier to bargain with, and they typically don’t *throw away the maintenance records* like dealers do. And I insisted on the maintenance records, and actually looked them over. It needed to have the right range of mileage — too low, and it’s been on too many short trips, with a lot of attendant startup wear. I wanted a particular trim level. And so on.

    Of course, I had a pre-purchase inspection done by good mechanics, after I inspected it myself. Of course the PPI included a compression test. I even went in the bay and watched the inspection, and talked with the mechanic.

    The upshot: I still ended up with a car with a few serious problems. It turns out my particular model of car had a bad design for some internal transmission parts. But the symptoms never show up when the car is warm, so neither the mechanic nor my own test driving ran into the issue. The only way to know is to drive it from a cold start on at least a moderately cool day, or to tear the transmission apart.

    The point is, even if you are super-thorough, you can still easily lose out with the used car. Vinny and others have an excellent point — you can *never* account for what the previous owner did with the car. The peace of mind that comes with buying new and knowing what the car’s been through since it had single-digit mileage is worth a lot. If I can afford to, I will never buy used again, unless I’m specifically after a vintage model. If you think that’s stupid, I think you must be for not getting it.

  • V. R.

    To those “you’re retarded for buying new” people: your blanket statements are, to use the parlance of our times, “teh fail.”

    I’m a well-educated engineer, I work on and fix cars. My friends and acquaintances ask me to go along with them to check out used cars. For my own most recent car, I didn’t have the $$ to buy new, so I bought a used one from a private party who met all my stringent criteria. Private parties are easier to bargain with, and they typically don’t *throw away the maintenance records* like dealers do. And I insisted on the maintenance records, and actually looked them over. It needed to have the right range of mileage — too low, and it’s been on too many short trips, with a lot of attendant startup wear. I wanted a particular trim level. And so on.

    Of course, I had a pre-purchase inspection done by good mechanics, after I inspected it myself. Of course the PPI included a compression test. I even went in the bay and watched the inspection, and talked with the mechanic.

    The upshot: I still ended up with a car with a few serious problems. It turns out my particular model of car had a bad design for some internal transmission parts. But the symptoms never show up when the car is warm, so neither the mechanic nor my own test driving ran into the issue. The only way to know is to drive it from a cold start on at least a moderately cool day, or to tear the transmission apart.

    The point is, even if you are super-thorough, you can still easily lose out with the used car. Vinny and others have an excellent point — you can *never* account for what the previous owner did with the car. The peace of mind that comes with buying new and knowing what the car’s been through since it had single-digit mileage is worth a lot. If I can afford to, I will never buy used again, unless I’m specifically after a vintage model. If you think that’s stupid, I think you must be for not getting it.

  • http://www.insignificantthoughts.com/ Vinny

    V.R.: You’re exactly with me. That’s my line of thinking too. In fact, most issues you would have a year or two down the line probably wouldn’t show up in a pre-purchase inspection anyway!

    I’m not really interested in purchasing someone else’s problems, so I won’t buy a used car.

  • http://www.insignificantthoughts.com Vinny

    V.R.: You’re exactly with me. That’s my line of thinking too. In fact, most issues you would have a year or two down the line probably wouldn’t show up in a pre-purchase inspection anyway!

    I’m not really interested in purchasing someone else’s problems, so I won’t buy a used car.

  • John C. Randolph

    I’m astounded that you even considered buying a car from Government Motors. The company has failed; it only continues to exist because of the UAW’s power within the Democratic party.

    -jcr

    • http://www.insignificantthoughts.com/ Vinny

      So, pray tell, what should I have purchased? A nice Japanese car that cost thousands more and offered less? Or maybe a nice German model that costs even more than that and offered even less?

      I liked my truck. I bought my truck. It was a good deal. Get over your partisan bullshit or you’re gonna be a very unhappy little boy.

  • John C. Randolph

    I’m astounded that you even considered buying a car from Government Motors. The company has failed; it only continues to exist because of the UAW’s power within the Democratic party.

    -jcr

    • http://www.insignificantthoughts.com Vinny

      So, pray tell, what should I have purchased? A nice Japanese car that cost thousands more and offered less? Or maybe a nice German model that costs even more than that and offered even less?

      I liked my truck. I bought my truck. It was a good deal. Get over your partisan bullshit or you’re gonna be a very unhappy little boy.

  • John C. Randolph

    Get over your partisan bullshit

    My objection to the bailouts is not partisan, it is constitutional. Plenty of congressmen from both wings of the ruling party are culpable for it.

    -jcr

  • John C. Randolph

    Get over your partisan bullshit

    My objection to the bailouts is not partisan, it is constitutional. Plenty of congressmen from both wings of the ruling party are culpable for it.

    -jcr

  • http://www.insignificantthoughts.com/ Vinny

    A: You mentioned the Democrats, not me.

    B: I don’t give two shits about the company. I’m buying a car, not a company. If I tried to avoid businesses that weren’t getting bailouts of some kind I couldn’t bank, eat, travel, or buy a car, so please, stop being stupid.

    C: No adult who uses the words “Ruling party” is to be taken seriously.

  • http://www.insignificantthoughts.com Vinny

    A: You mentioned the Democrats, not me.

    B: I don’t give two shits about the company. I’m buying a car, not a company. If I tried to avoid businesses that weren’t getting bailouts of some kind I couldn’t bank, eat, travel, or buy a car, so please, stop being stupid.

    C: No adult who uses the words “Ruling party” is to be taken seriously.

  • Anonymous

    Curry Chevrolet is really awful like you’ve been complaining. I ONLY returned a call from a guy I used to go with who was doing paperwork hours there. When I called, Greg Cohen(I believe), the Finance guy was very disrespectful, unprofessional, discourteous, unhelpful and abusive to me. All this yet wanted to know my name after he refused to give my X the phone or tell him I called. The next day I was playing around with my new phone and the mini joy stick didn’t hit my X’s number and instead hit there’s which was right next to his so I hung up quick and had heard no ring anyway. Well, a lady called back and was yelling/harassing me and then she put the General Manager on the phone and he was yelling at me too. Neither one would give me a chance to speak uninteruppted and instead were very hostile and mean-spirited. I was in fact VERY polite and respectful and was shocked with their behavior. With the experience of this alone, I suggest; EVERYONE STAY AWAY FROM CURRY CHEVROLET IN SCARSDALE AS THEY ARE EXTREMELY DISRESPECTFUL, ABUSIVE AND COULD CARE LESS ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS AS I AND MANY OTHER BLOGGERS HAVE EXPERIENCED. If you can’t even communicate with people and have them respect you, they are BAD news and need to be avoided at all costs. The abusive treatment I briefly experienced with Curry Chevrolet was just a hint that they are TROUBLE!!!!~*~*~*~*~Respectfully and Sincerely, Ms. Victoria Mary Stong / Humanitarian, Civil Rights & Community Activist, Singer,9/11 Family Member, Former 1st Responder & Ground Zero Worker 9/11-11/10/01-Well Seasoned in and out of all types Media

  • Victoria Mary Stong / Activist

    Curry Chevrolet is really awful like you’ve been complaining. I ONLY returned a call from a guy I used to go with who was doing paperwork hours there. When I called, Greg Cohen(I believe), the Finance guy was very disrespectful, unprofessional, discourteous, unhelpful and abusive to me. All this yet wanted to know my name after he refused to give my X the phone or tell him I called. The next day I was playing around with my new phone and the mini joy stick didn’t hit my X’s number and instead hit there’s which was right next to his so I hung up quick and had heard no ring anyway. Well, a lady called back and was yelling/harassing me and then she put the General Manager on the phone and he was yelling at me too. Neither one would give me a chance to speak uninteruppted and instead were very hostile and mean-spirited. I was in fact VERY polite and respectful and was shocked with their behavior. With the experience of this alone, I suggest; EVERYONE STAY AWAY FROM CURRY CHEVROLET IN SCARSDALE AS THEY ARE EXTREMELY DISRESPECTFUL, ABUSIVE AND COULD CARE LESS ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS AS I AND MANY OTHER BLOGGERS HAVE EXPERIENCED. If you can’t even communicate with people and have them respect you, they are BAD news and need to be avoided at all costs. The abusive treatment I briefly experienced with Curry Chevrolet was just a hint that they are TROUBLE!!!!~*~*~*~*~Respectfully and Sincerely, Ms. Victoria Mary Stong / Humanitarian, Civil Rights & Community Activist, Singer,9/11 Family Member, Former 1st Responder & Ground Zero Worker 9/11-11/10/01-Well Seasoned in and out of all types Media

  • Anonymous

    The moral of my story is(ha,ha); don’t call Greg Cohen in Financing at (914)725-3506 or you’ll be sorry! The GM was having a party threatening when I misdialed…”If you call here again, I’ll consider it harassment”! What a lowlife. The number “(914)725-3506″ is in their Curry Chevorlet website and is a public number, so why was he so angry and upset like Mr. Road Rage? He obviously isn’t trying to gain new customers with his tone of voice and level of speech(yelling). How does he know if I could be a customer or not? He just started out yelling at me. I could have been a prospective customer and his very poor treatment of me certainly shot that to hell. My family at one point was offering to buy me a car so he’s a jerk anyway. Dealerships that are abusive and CORRUPTED like Curry Chevrolet do just that….start off by being smart-a-ses. They think their cute and then they lose customers for their unethical and illegal practices. Well, I give it to God……his wrath is no joke for those that go out of their way to be mean-spirited, illegal, disrespectful and strip people of their rights in one aspect or another. Again…….SHAME ON CURRY CHEVROLET. May they sink in debt like they put their customers in using tricky schemes and tricks on their law-abiding and hard-working customers. NO ONE AT CURRY CHEVROLET HAD ANY RIGHT TO YELL AT AND/OR DISRESPECT ME AS I WAS RESPECTFUL AND KIND TO THEM, PERIOD! I love shopping American and will do so even if I have to spend a little more, actually. We need to support American workers and ourselves before we can help others. If we don’t have a good foundation, we ourselves are bound to fail. Curry Chevrolet gives American Dealerships a bad taste in peoples mouthes. I will NEVER forget how they lied to and disrespected me while lying anyway. They need some home training, ethical business training and need a scholarship(since they don’t have much money as they’re failures as employees and as a business obviously)for charm school so they can behave like civilized and decent human beings with ethical business practices instead.
    God bless the ethical and decent Dealerships of America!

  • Victoria Mary Stong / Activist

    The moral of my story is(ha,ha); don’t call Greg Cohen in Financing at (914)725-3506 or you’ll be sorry! The GM was having a party threatening when I misdialed…”If you call here again, I’ll consider it harassment”! What a lowlife. The number “(914)725-3506″ is in their Curry Chevorlet website and is a public number, so why was he so angry and upset like Mr. Road Rage? He obviously isn’t trying to gain new customers with his tone of voice and level of speech(yelling). How does he know if I could be a customer or not? He just started out yelling at me. I could have been a prospective customer and his very poor treatment of me certainly shot that to hell. My family at one point was offering to buy me a car so he’s a jerk anyway. Dealerships that are abusive and CORRUPTED like Curry Chevrolet do just that….start off by being smart-a-ses. They think their cute and then they lose customers for their unethical and illegal practices. Well, I give it to God……his wrath is no joke for those that go out of their way to be mean-spirited, illegal, disrespectful and strip people of their rights in one aspect or another. Again…….SHAME ON CURRY CHEVROLET. May they sink in debt like they put their customers in using tricky schemes and tricks on their law-abiding and hard-working customers. NO ONE AT CURRY CHEVROLET HAD ANY RIGHT TO YELL AT AND/OR DISRESPECT ME AS I WAS RESPECTFUL AND KIND TO THEM, PERIOD! I love shopping American and will do so even if I have to spend a little more, actually. We need to support American workers and ourselves before we can help others. If we don’t have a good foundation, we ourselves are bound to fail. Curry Chevrolet gives American Dealerships a bad taste in peoples mouthes. I will NEVER forget how they lied to and disrespected me while lying anyway. They need some home training, ethical business training and need a scholarship(since they don’t have much money as they’re failures as employees and as a business obviously)for charm school so they can behave like civilized and decent human beings with ethical business practices instead.
    God bless the ethical and decent Dealerships of America!

  • http://www.carparts-finder.co.uk/ Car Parts Finder

    Unlucky!! So in the end what car did you go for?

    ps: "C: No adult who uses the words "Ruling party" is to be taken seriously. "

    — Too funny!!!

    CPF

  • http://www.carparts-finder.co.uk Car Parts Finder

    Unlucky!! So in the end what car did you go for?

    ps: "C: No adult who uses the words "Ruling party" is to be taken seriously. "

    — Too funny!!!

    CPF

  • Anonymous

    My Former Boyfriend who was the purchaser bought a Ford Explorer. He was angry that coffee was spilled in the coffee holder and said he’d talk to them about it. He loves a very clean vehicle. I think he was scammed too. He had told me after leaving them one night that he thought he’d get to bring home the one he choose that night. Then they told him they had to do some more paperwork. Sounds like some elses story on here that when you choose a vehicle, they say they need to “Finalize the paperwork” and take that night to switch it with a less valuable vehicle. I’m not talking to him anymore, but I DID leave a message on his answering machine that he should check this website as other’s like him have been scammed. He called back to talk about it but I don’t want to answer any more of his calls. I just left a message for him to check the internet to see how other’s have been scammed by Curry Chevrolet. I think he saw this website because his message said a lot has happened since I last talked to him essentially. He is very argumentative so I’m avoiding him.

  • Victoria Mary Stong

    My Former Boyfriend who was the purchaser bought a Ford Explorer. He was angry that coffee was spilled in the coffee holder and said he’d talk to them about it. He loves a very clean vehicle. I think he was scammed too. He had told me after leaving them one night that he thought he’d get to bring home the one he choose that night. Then they told him they had to do some more paperwork. Sounds like some elses story on here that when you choose a vehicle, they say they need to “Finalize the paperwork” and take that night to switch it with a less valuable vehicle. I’m not talking to him anymore, but I DID leave a message on his answering machine that he should check this website as other’s like him have been scammed. He called back to talk about it but I don’t want to answer any more of his calls. I just left a message for him to check the internet to see how other’s have been scammed by Curry Chevrolet. I think he saw this website because his message said a lot has happened since I last talked to him essentially. He is very argumentative so I’m avoiding him.

  • Anonymous

    I told him the “finalize the papers” trick that Curry Chevrolet in Scarsdale always plays on their customers according to someone else on this website.

  • Victoria Mary Stong

    I told him the “finalize the papers” trick that Curry Chevrolet in Scarsdale always plays on their customers according to someone else on this website.

  • Anonymous

    Car Parts Finder: Sorry if you were’nt talking to me.

  • Victoria Mary Stong

    Car Parts Finder: Sorry if you were’nt talking to me.

  • Anonymous

    Wow………….am I being blatantly disregarded?

  • Victoria Mary Stong

    Wow………….am I being blatantly disregarded?

  • Anonymous

    Trust me when I tell you EVERYONE needs to see this video on YouTube:”Glenn Beck: Cars.gov allows government to takeover your computer”. A friend of mine that works for CBS just emailed this to me. DON’T GO TO THE WEBSITE, IT WILL MAKE YOUR INTERNET LEGALLY ACCESSIBLE 24/7 TO THE GOVERNMENT. Just see the video and you’ll understand!

  • Victoria Mary Stong

    Trust me when I tell you EVERYONE needs to see this video on YouTube:”Glenn Beck: Cars.gov allows government to takeover your computer”. A friend of mine that works for CBS just emailed this to me. DON’T GO TO THE WEBSITE, IT WILL MAKE YOUR INTERNET LEGALLY ACCESSIBLE 24/7 TO THE GOVERNMENT. Just see the video and you’ll understand!

  • Anonymous

    Check this video warning about Cars dot Gov too: http://www.autosmartcar.com/2009/08/04/cars-dot-gov-do-not-do-this-at-home/

  • Victoria Mary Stong

    Check this video warning about Cars dot Gov too: http://www.autosmartcar.com/2009/08/04/cars-dot-gov-do-not-do-this-at-home/

  • Moss

    Good for you… you are the number 2 result when you google “Curry Chevrolet”

  • Moss

    Good for you… you are the number 2 result when you google “Curry Chevrolet”

  • http://www.heinrichchevy.com/ Charles

    This is unfortunate to hear. As a Chevrolet dealer in Buffalo I certainly don't like hearing stories tarnishing our brand. The dealer may have brought it upon themselves though, this was a rather huge mistake. As the poster above points out, you rank pretty high (you're third now) when searching curry Chevrolet. Looks like you may have got your revenge.